Use of Goal Pegs for AHAI Games

Effective immediately, there shall be no peg use to anchor nets during games involving teams aged 10U and younger.

This rule is effective immediately and will carry through all games, including Illinois state playoffs.

Declaration of Player Safety, Fair Play, & Respect video

 

USA Hockey is committed to creating a safe and fair environment for all participants. Respect for the game, opponents, coaches, and officials is a critical part of that environment and it covers several different aspects of sportsmanship and fair play. This Declaration of Safety, Fair Play and Respect will guide a change in culture as to what is considered to be acceptable/unacceptable body checking and competitive contact at all levels of play.

Keeping an eye out for Cat Eye goalie masks

CATS MAY HAVE NINE LIVES but a goaltender only has two eyes. That’s why cat eye goaltending masks are not allowed to be used in USA Hockey sanctioned games.

Cat eye masks are popular among professional goaltenders because the wider, tapered eye hole provides greater visibility compared to the grid-like cage. The eye hole is small enough to keep a puck from passing through, but that says nothing about a stick blade.

It may seem like a one-in-a-million chance that a stick blade will find its way through the iron bars, but there are enough examples of it happening to keep young goaltenders away from using one. USA Hockey requires goaltenders to wear a helmet and mask that has been certified by the Hockey Equipment Certification Council.
Sometimes goalies will try to game the system by keeping two masks in their bags, one with the cat eye mask and the other legal one.

A goaltender found wearing unapproved equipment will be instructed to leave the ice and not return until he or she has an approved helmet and mask. “We’re all about American goalies respecting the rules,” said Steve Thompson, the manager of goaltending for the ADM. “We don’t see forwards coming onto the ice with half shields so we shouldn’t see goalies coming onto the ice trying to sneak a cat eye.”

In recent years, manufacturers have developed a modified cat eye mask, which meets HECC standards. Coaches, parents and players are encouraged to educate themselves on the differences between goalie masks on the mark.
The safest way to find out if a mask is legal is to look for a valid HECC certification sticker.

Taken from USAHOCKEYMAGAZINE.COM, September 2019, page 18

USAH Directive: Banging the Boards (Rule 601(b) 1&5)

UNSPORTSMANLIKE CONDUCT

(BANGING THE BOARDS)

A bench minor penalty for unsportsmanlike behavior shall be assessed to any team whose player(s) or team officials bang the boards with a stick or any other object, including skates or arms, at any time, including after a body check regardless as to whether the check was penalized or not.

The spirit and intent of this rule is to eliminate unsportsmanlike behavior that is designed to “taunt” or “intimidate” an opponent through the celebration of an unnecessary or illegal body check.  Simply banging the stick, or other object, against the boards while on the player’s bench is not a penalty.  However, it is deemed to be unsportsmanlike conduct and should be penalized when done as a means of escalating dangerous and/or unnecessary physical play where there is no intent to legally gain possession of the puck.

The correct procedure to apply this interpretation is to first warn the offending team once after the first violationAny further violation of this policy by the same team should be penalized by assessing a bench minor to the team under Rule 601(b)1 & 5.  This bench minor is to be served by a player on the ice at the time of the infraction.  Once this bench minor has been served, any further violations by the same team shall be penalized by assessing a bench minor penalty.

**If a bench minor penalty for a violation of this policy is being served and before that bench minor expires another violation by the same team occurs that teams head coach shall be assessed a game misconduct under Rule601(e)1.

 

 

USA Hockey SafeSport Program (NEW POLICY)

Thursday, June 20, 2019

Dear USA Hockey official,

You recently received a summary of several significant changes to the USA Hockey SafeSport Program. This note includes additional specific information pertinent to officials, including related to SafeSport Training requirements, mandatory reporting, and the Minor Athlete Abuse Protection Policies. Thank you for your dedication to USA Hockey programs and efforts to keep our participants safe and our programs free from misconduct or abuse.

SafeSport Training

All officials who are or will be seventeen (17) years old or older as of December 31 of that registration season must complete the SafeSport Training program as a condition of completing their certification requirements every season.

Beginning this season, the training must now be completed every year prior to participation each season (however, anyone who completed training in the most recent season (2018-19) will retain valid training status for 2019-20, and will complete training annually beginning in 2020-21). The training is provided by the U.S. Center for SafeSport, and each official must first complete the “Core Center for SafeSport Training,” which is completed online and takes approximately 90 – 120 minutes to complete. In subsequent seasons, officials will need to complete the Center for SafeSport’s “Refresher Course,” which is also online and takes 30 minutes or less to complete. There is no cost to complete either training course.

If you (or your son or daughter) are under 18 at the time of training, USA Hockey is required to obtain parental consent for the official to complete training. If you registered on or after May 28, 2019, then the consent was incorporated into your registration; if you registered prior to May 28, USA Hockey will be contacting you soon to obtain the consent of the parents for a minor age official to complete the SafeSport Training.

Mandatory Reporting

If you are an adult-aged official, then according to federal law you are considered a mandatory reporter of child abuse, including sexual abuse. In the event of any actual or suspected sexual misconduct or child abuse, you must report such information to the U.S. Center for SafeSport and, when appropriate, to applicable law enforcement.

Minor Athlete Abuse Protection Policies

The Minor Athlete Abuse Protection Policies (“MAAPP Policies”) were mandated by federal law to be put into effect by the U.S. Center for SafeSport, and are included in the USA Hockey SafeSport Program Handbook with specific information for hockey programs. The MAAPP Policies are prevention policies to prohibit and/or avoid situations where risks of misconduct can occur, including:

• One-on-One Interactions. This policy prohibits one-on-one interactions between adult members of USA Hockey or those authorized by a USA Hockey program to have regular contact with or authority over minors, unless they occur at an observable and interruptible distance by another adult. There are exceptions for emergency circumstances. The policy specifically addresses situations where these types of interactions might occur, including in meetings with a player, in individual training sessions and in settings outside the hockey program.

• Locker Rooms. USA Hockey’s existing Locker Room Policy was updated, and includes specific locker room provisions for officials to address situations when officials of different genders share a locker room and to avoid situations where an adult official and a minor are alone in a locker room. Please review the new locker room policies in the USA Hockey SafeSport Program Handbook.

• Travel. Travel is a high risk time for misconduct to occur, including when officials travel together. USA Hockey’s travel policy has been updated for both “local travel” (transportation and travel to and from local games and events) and “organization/team travel” (travel away from the home area and may include overnight stays in a hotel for games or tournaments). Except in the case of emergency, an adult official may not ride in a vehicle alone, travel alone with or share a hotel or sleeping arrangement with an unrelated minor participant.

• Athletic Training Modalities. Although officials generally do not receive treatment at the rink, from trainers or medical personnel, this policy ensures that any type of athletic training, including massages, rubdowns, taping, etc., occurs in an open and interruptible location.

• Social Media and Electronic Communications. This policy has been updated. All electronic communication from an adult official, supervisor, assignor or other person of authority to a minor-aged participant must be professional in nature. Absent emergency circumstances, if an adult official, supervisor, assignor or other person of authority needs to communicate directly with a minor-aged participant via electronic communications (including social media), the minor’s parent must be copied.

A revised copy of the USA Hockey SafeSport Program Handbook can be found at the USA Hockey website at www.usahockey.com/safesportprogram. Please refer to the SafeSport Handbook for details of these and other policies affecting USA Hockey programs. You can also reach out to your Affiliate SafeSport Coordinator or to USA Hockey if you have questions or need assistance.

Thank you again for all of your efforts in support of the safety of participants in USA Hockey programs.

USA Hockey Advanced Officiating Symposium and New Tenured Official Program

USA Hockey announced that it will host its first-ever Advanced Officiating Symposium July 26-28, 2019, at the Minneapolis Airport Marriott in Bloomington, Minnesota. The first-of-its-kind symposium is open to any official who has been completely registered at Level 3 or Level 4 for each of the previous three hockey seasons and is seeking to obtain “tenured” status within the USA Hockey Officiating Program.

Read More…

Veryifying your Scoresheet

whether it’s handwritten or electronic, the score sheet is not deemed “good to go” until an official signs off on it at the conclusion of the game. Rule 502(e) is clear in saying, “At the conclusion of the game, the referee shall check the official score sheet, including team rosters and players in uniform, for accuracy prior to signing.” Regardless as to what system is used (hard copy or electronic scoring), the score sheet is considered an official record that documents the participants and the actions that take place during a game, and officials must adhere to their responsibility to treat it as such. Teams need them to document participation for eligibility in state or national tournaments, or to provide verification of a suspension served. They may also be keeping stats on players for their continued development and promotion to higher levels of play.  Plus, the score sheet provides a means to track progressive penalties or to identify trends within a local area or league. 

To read the whole article from USA Hockey, click here: Have you verified the score sheet?

Officials’ Dress Code

Playoffs… We’ve all worked hard to get here. Keeping working hard, and request games only that you will give 100%. Players and coaches have worked all year to attain the right to play in these games and deserve the best efforts.

Your appearance before the game sets the tone for your officiating. If team members, staff and spectators observe an official arriving late, dressed in a casual manner, and clearly agitated, they will expect a poor on-ice performance, and often that is what occurs.

AHAI expects that officials who accept games from AHAI ASSIGNER to arrive no less than 30 minutes before game time and be dressed in an appropriate manner (business casual). Caps, sports team jackets, ancient shoes and work jeans are not acceptable. We do not expect formal wear, but dearly there is a middle style that can satisfy all. It is remarkable how frequently your appearance is mentioned – both good and bad. Take a few moments to dress appropriately and be a class act when you enter the rink.

ALL Officials: Waiver necessary for MB Arena

The Chicago Blackhawks are requiring all participants to the MB Arena (their new facility) to sign a waiver before the person is allowed to use the facility.

This includes officials.

 

Download the mandatory waiver here: MB Arena waiver

2017-21 Rule interpretations memo from USAH

In the past few weeks, a discussion regarding specific interpretations of the new rules has occurred. Through these discussions, various game situations were brought up and questions arose regarding the implementation of the new rules. These issues were brought to USA Hockey. USA Hockey issued a statement last night regarding these issues and the statement is immediately below.

Please review the statement and utilize its instructions when officiating games this year.

Michael Barrett
Illinois Referee in Chief & Supervisor of Officials

*************************************************************************************************************

Ladies & Gentlemen,

Over the past few weeks, there have been some questions asked pertaining to some of the new rules. In an effort to answer those questions consistently and to provide our membership with the most current rules information we have assembled a FAQ memo.

QUESTION: If an attacking player in the attacking zone takes a shot and it is deflected, directed or tipped off of or by an attacking player and as a result the puck goes off of the goal post or cross bar and out of play where is the ensuing face-off?
ANSWER: The face-off shall be at one of the marked end zone face spots in that attacking zone.

QUESTION: If an attacking player in the Neutral Zone on his attacking side of the center red line takes a shot and it goes off of the goal post or cross bar and out of play where is the ensuing face-off?
ANSWER: The face-off shall be at one of the marked end zone face-off spots in that attacking zone.

QUESTION: If an attacking player in the Neutral Zone on his defending side of the center red line takes a shot and it goes off of the goal post or cross bar and out of play where is the ensuing face-off?
ANSWER: In this situation, there is a potential icing violation involved. If the puck, after striking the cross bar or goal post crosses the goal line by going out of the rink anywhere behind the goal line extended vertically then an icing infraction should be enforced. If the puck goes out of the rink without crossing the goal line then an end zone face-off in the attacking end zone should take place.

QUESTION: If an attacking player in the attacking zone attempts a pass and the puck strikes off the back of the goal frame and out of play, where should the face-off be located?
ANSWER: The face-off shall be located at the closest marked Neutral Zone face-off spot nearest to where the pass was originated.

QUESTION: The ‘Summary of Face-Off Locations’ (in Appendix II) identifies three (3) situations that call for a center ice face-off. Are there any other situations that may result in a center ice face-off?
ANSWER: Yes, with the new ‘9 Spot’ face-off location rule a center ice face-off may take place provided it is the nearest marked face-off location to a stoppage of play that requires a Neutral Zone face-off under the last play face-off rules.

QUESTION: Rule 615(c) states that “A match penalty (for all age classifications) shall be assessed to any player who deliberately removes his opponent’s helmet/facemask prior to or during an altercation” yet Situation 13 (page 251/Rule/Case Book) states it should be only a game misconduct at the Adult level. Which is correct?
ANSWER: The correct penalty to assess in this situation is a Match penalty at the Adult level.
Situation 13 in the Case Book was an oversight during the editing process and the reference to the Adult Age Classification exception should have been deleted.

QUESTION: Does the Rule 624(b.1) {Icing} apply to the Tier I 15 year old ONLY age classification?
ANSWER: Rule 624 (b.1) DOES apply to this age group. The 15 year old age classification can legally ice the puck when the team is shorthanded.